About Dublin Port

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.  Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland with all cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port.

Dublin Port is one of five major ports classified as Tier 1 / Tier 2 ports in National Port Policy and categorised as core / comprehensive ports in the EU’s TEN-T network.  Dublin Port’s large share of national port volumes, particularly in the Ro-Ro and Lo-Lo modes, arises due to a combination of two factors, location and depth of water. Dublin Port is a key part of the national port system and Dublin Port Company seeks to ensure that it plays its role in providing national port capacity.

Dublin Port handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland. Located in the heart of Dublin City and at the hub of the national road and rail network, Dublin Port is a key strategic access point for Ireland and in particular the Dublin area.

 

Overall tonnage declines in Dublin Port in Q1 2020 by -4.8%

The latest figures show a decline in overall port tonnage of -4.8% compared to the first quarter of 2019.

first three months of 2019 were dominated by the original Brexit departure date of 31st March 2019 and volumes through Dublin were very high due to stockpiling. (Q1 2019 imports were 8.0% ahead of imports in Q1 2018).

Against this base, significant growth in Q1 2020 was always unlikely but the impact of the coronavirus, particularly in March, combined with significant shipping disruptions due to bad weather in February caused volumes to decline by 470,000 tonnes or -4.8% in the first quarter of 2020.

Unitised trade (trailers and containers combined) fell by -4.4% to 360,000 units with Ro-Ro declining by -5.3% to 256,000 units and Lo-Lo by -2.2% to 187,000 TEU.

Imports of new trade vehicles through Dublin Port decreased by -10.3% to 30,000 in the first quarter and a significant continuing decline seems inevitable for the rest of the year.

Bulk liquid volumes, primarily petroleum products, grew by +4.4% to 1.1m tonnes. Aviation fuel accounts for more than one-fifth of all petroleum imports in Dublin Port and the impact of the coronavirus on air travel will lead to a large decline in imports of aviation fuel and in overall petroleum imports into Dublin Port in the months ahead.

Bulk solid commodities declined by -13.2% to 468,000 tonnes.

Ferry passenger volumes decreased by -17.8% to 224,000. Similarly, the number of tourist vehicles fell by -18.0% to 67,000. One cruise ship called to Dublin Port in Q1 2020 and the outlook for this sector everywhere for the remainder of the cruise season to end-September is bleak.

Learn More: HERE